Tips for Creating an Elevator Pitch for Your Handmade Business

Create an Elevator Pitch for your Handmade Business

Do you have an elevator pitch for your handmade business?

You know what your brand sells. You know why customers need your product. But do your potential customers know? You, my friend, need an elevator pitch for your handmade business. And don’t worry, creating one is quick and relatively painless. :)

Let’s get started. First, let’s define elevator pitch: An elevator pitch is a short, simple summary of your product, service, or organization and what it can do for customers. The pitch should include the name of your business/organization and vivid verbs and descriptive adjectives that state what you do.

Tips for an Effective Elevator Pitch:

1. Keep it short.

Can you state the pitch clearly in 30 seconds or less? A Tweetable (140 characters or fewer) elevator pitch is best, especially if you will be sharing it online.

2. Keep it simple.

Don’t use jargon or terms that only people in your niche understand. First-time visitors to your blog, website, or social media venue should be able to understand the concept of your business (without needing a dictionary).

3. Keep it exciting.

Use verbs and adjectives that make your business sound exciting. Write a pitch that makes people want to learn more about you and your business.

Places to Share your Elevator Pitch:

1. In Person

  • in an elevator (obviously)
  • at family gatherings when people ask, “What do you do?”
  • at craft fairs where you sell your products
  • at conventions
  • in line at the post office when you’re waiting to ship your packages

2. In Print

  • on your business card
  • on your letterhead
  • on your shipping labels
  • on the thank-you note you include with your products

3. Online

  • in your email signature
  • in your Etsy shop title
  • in your Facebook fan page About box
  • in your Twitter bio
  • in your Etsy shop announcement and/or profile page
  • on your blog

Today’s assignment: Set aside 10 minutes of time to write an elevator pitch or evaluate your current one. Share it with us in the comments, will you? (I’ve posted mine below.)

JulieSignature

Top photo: I See the Light

Here is my elevator pitch:
“On the Dot Creations features fabulous handmade designs and shares biz tips with those who create them.”

I like yours. This is a great idea. Better get to work. I’ll be back with mine.

Can’t wait to read it! :)

Here it is. I am open to suggestions. :)
Amber Dawn Jewelry is a collection of unique and bold jewelry designs, handmade by me, Amber Dawn Guge.

This is great, Amber! Unique, bold, and handmade are perfect adjectives to describe your products!

This is mine. Any suggestions would be super helpful!
Pop Heart Press offers custom art prints for the modern family. Designed to engage children in learning, introduce shapes, colors, animals, geography, numbers & letters, and pretty your house, each art print is designed by artist Heather Bredimus and printed digitally on professional paper with archival inks.
Too long?

What a bright, colorful shop you have, Heather! I love it!
I don’t think your elevator pitch is too long — it just depends on where you plan to use it. If you were on an elevator or at a craft fair where you could talk to a prospective customer in person, I think this pitch would definitely be appropriate.
However, for shorter spaces like an email signature or a Twitter bio, the shop title that you used in your Etsy shop (“Custom art prints for the modern family”) and also the tagline that you used in your banner graphic “Posters, Stationery, Teaching Tools, Gifts” are GREAT short descriptions of what you create.
By the way, I love the “teaching tools” angle. As a mother of a little boy who is learning to read and loves colorful flashcards and memory aids, I’d snatch products like that right up! Perhaps you could really focus on that angle in your shop??
Thanks for submitting your pitch, and best of luck in your brand new shop! :)

Thank you!!

Thank you so much Julie! Your feedback was so sweet and helpful!

Of course, Heather! Glad to help! :)

Here’s mine:
“Let’s go back to basics in style. You-Lee-Ana Boutique is your stop for eco-friendly, handmade wearables and yarn creations.”
I have no confidence in what I am doing anymore. I went to a craft show the other day and it sucked. I lost all my desire. So, my elevator pitch is probably just as bad as what I make (that’s what some people said at the craft show). Sorry I am complaining here. Suggestions would be sooo helpful

Your elevator pitch includes some fantastic keywords, Iuliana! “Eco-friendly, handmade wearables, and yarn creations” are phrases that describe your work beautifully!
I’m sorry to hear about your recent discouraging experience at a craft show. What made it “suck”?

Well, first of all, it turned out that it wasn’t a craft show to begin with. It was a shopping night at a country club. The person that sold me the spot made it sound like they have tons of people attending and that my products will be a hit. Well, they weren’t. Very few people attended, and the ones that did seemed to be interested more in the free hors d’eouvres, than everything else. There were a couple other crafters there. Everyone else were distributors, like Mary Kay or Lia Sophia. It seems like it was the wrong crowd. On top of everything, it was really far from where I love, my baby has an ear-infection and I got no sleep for 3 days, AND there was a lady that walked by and said that she hates my necklaces.
I’m thinking that maybe this whole crafting business is not my thing, as it is not profitable. I’ve originally started, because my husband was laid off, and with a brand new baby, I thought I could make some off of one of my passions: creating. Well, it hasn’t happened yet – the money part, that is. As much as I love doing this, I feel like this isn’t emotionally/spiritually rewarding anymore. Should I keep at it? Or give up?

Wow! Moments like that definitely take the wind out of a small biz owner’s sails. My first instinct is this: don’t make a decision about continuing (or not continuing) your business after a bad experience like that. Give yourself some time to recover from the hurtful words and discouragement.
Any effort that is financially, emotionally, and spiritually draining probably isn’t the best situation for you OR your family. Before giving up, though, how about trying this:
Set a time goal (whether a month or two months or whatever). Determine to try your very best to increase your business during that time period. Work as hard as possible on your marketing, product creation, and customer service. Do your best with a “no regrets” attitude. You might even want to keep a journal of some sort to track your emotions and your success (or lack of it).
At the end of that time period, reflect on your business. After spending all that time and energy putting forth your best efforts, do you have anything to show for it? That will be the time for some serious evaluation — whether or not to continue the business.
Don’t give up yet — keep me informed on how you’re doing, okay? :)

Here’s a crack at mine:
Kiki’s Things offers unique, handmade costumes and dress up clothing for children of all ages.

This is perfect, Kristine! I love it! :)

And let’s see how I can refine our craft show shpiel into an elevator pitch:
Book-Inz are handmade, magnetic bookmarks that hang out on your book’s cover while you read, the ribbon is your bookmark, so you never take it off your book until you’re done reading.
Hm. Yeah, not happy with that. Book-Inz are a must be seen in action to be appreciated product. It’s something we’ve discovered over time and trial and error.
And for Luliana – we had a show like that a few months ago – totally sucked – and we were the ONLY handmade vendor out of the twenty home business types. Consider it a marketing adventure – whether they liked you or not, your name is out there. Someone saw your stuff – it may not have been what they were looking for THAT day. But maybe in the future they’ll have a need for something like your craft and they’ll remember you. I can’t tell you how many times I pass by without buying, but I remember what they have and I go back and buy from them later. I actually had a similar show this past Saturday. Live and learn – I won’t be doing THAT show again, but I know that my product is a great product. SOmeone once told me – Put out into the world what you would like to see in it. That’s what you are doing. If you think it’s amazing, then there is someone else in the world who will, too. Keep calm and carry on! :)

You’re right . . . your Book-inz are best understood after seeing them in person. What a great idea!
Thanks for adding your thoughts about Iuliana’s recent discouraging experience. Hearing about others’ handmade biz adventures can be so helpful.
Thanks, too, for reviewing my Secrets of Savvy Etsy Sellers e-book on your blog. I’m honored!

This is mine…
Carbrinice Art creates one of a kind handcrafted jewelry.

Thanks for submitting your elevator pitch, Melysa. It might be a good idea to add a short phrase in the pitch that distinguishes your shop from the thousands of other “one-of-a-kind handcrafted jewelry” shops on Etsy. Perhaps a phrase like “featuring wire-wrapped pieces” or “featuring delicate gems” or something else that applies to your pieces. What makes your shop different from other other jewelry shops? Mention that, if possible.

This is what I use…..Simply Whimsical- vintage inspired handmade aprons, created from Simple designs and Whimsical fabrics!

This is great, Kathy! Thanks for submitting it!

Mine are:
ChariT’s Inspirational Creations, fashionably unique handmade jewelry made to uplift and inspire you!
or
ChariT’s Inspirational Creations, fun and fashionable handmade jewelry made to uplift and inspire you!
I don’t totally like either one of these lol.

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